Membership in the Bar of the Supreme Court of the United States

Bar of the Supreme Court of the United States pic

Bar of the Supreme Court of the United States
Image: history.com

A legal professional for more than three decades, Paul Seeman has served as an attorney and deputy county counsel, as well as a judge for the Alameda County Superior Court in California. In addition to his bench service, he served as a member of the Judicial Council Task Force for Criminal Justice Collaboration on Mental Health Issues. As an attorney, Paul Seeman was also a member of the Bar of the Supreme Court of the United States.

There are a number of reasons why a litigator would seek admission to the Bar of the Supreme Court. Membership has a pragmatic component since in almost every case court rules dictate that each party to a case being argued in court must be represented by a member of the Supreme Court Bar in good standing.

Additional perks come with bar membership, as well. For the general public, attending a session of open court requires standing in line for a good number of hours before the 10 a.m. arguments commence. Bar members, however, have their own special section of the courtroom in which they are able to sit. Seating is limited to those who arrive first, but the line for bar members is typically much shorter than the one for the general public.

The Dipsea – a Storied Northern California Trail Race

The Dipsea pic

The Dipsea
Image: dipsea.org

Over his more than three decades in the field of law, Paul Seeman served in a number of roles including judge, attorney, and educator. While engaged with his career, Paul Seeman also participated for many years in the Dipsea, an annual cross-country race in Northern California.

First held in November of 1905, the Dipsea has taken place every year since 1983 on the second Sunday of June. America’s oldest trail race, it requires runners to navigate a strenuous but scenic 7.4-mile course which begins in Mill Valley and extends to Stinson Beach.

The race was first organized by members of the Olympic Club in San Francisco and was named for the Dipsea Inn, a seaside establishment that served as the endpoint of the 1905 race. Over the years, the Dipsea has welcomed such runners as Jack Kirk, who ran the race in 74 consecutive years, winning it twice. In 2016, Brian Pilcher crossed the finish line first to earn his third Dipsea victory.

NCJFCJ Prepares to Hold 80th Annual Conference in Washington, D.C.

National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges pic

National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges
Image: ncjfcj.org

Former judge Paul Seeman served the Alameda County Superior Court from 2009 to 2013. While serving as an Alameda County judge, Paul Seeman also chaired the International Committee of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ).

Founded in 1937, NCJFCJ is celebrating its 80th year working to improve juvenile and family justice courts in the United States. The organization’s 80th anniversary will be a focus of the upcoming NCJFCJ Annual Conference, which will take place July 16-19, 2017, in Washington, D.C.

Over the course of four days, attendees at NCJFCJ’s 80th Annual Conference will have the opportunity to take part in presentations and other education sessions organized into several training tracks. They will also get the chance to hear from a list of prominent speakers that will include renowned legal scholar Erwin Chemerinsky, who will deliver the event’s opening keynote address.

Those interested in attending can register for the NCJFCJ Annual Conference online. Standard registration fees range from $745 for members to $940 for non-members who register before June 30. Both members and non-members who wait until July to register will pay an additional $50. To register or learn more about the event, visit www.ncjfcj.org.

Non-Physical Signs of Child Abuse

Child Abuse pic

Child Abuse
Image: nspcc.org.uk

A former judge in California, Paul Seeman possesses more than 30 years of legal experience, including 24 years running his own firm. In his position as an Alameda County Superior Court judge, Paul Seeman handled dependency cases stemming from child abuse.

Child abuse can be physical, such as by willful infliction of injury, or sexual, such as by assault or exploitation. It can also include mental abuse, negligent treatment that threatens a child’s health or safety, and cruel and inhumane treatment.

Abuse cases are not always evidenced by physical scars, bruises, or broken bones. Warning signs of abuse include: excessive withdrawal; constant fear; crippling anxiety; extreme behavior, such as constant watchfulness; inappropriate clothing, such as sweaters on hot days; problems sitting or walking; knowledge of sexual acts way above his/her age; fear of changing clothes in front of others; poor hygiene; and untreated illness.

You do not have to witness child abuse to report it. The law allows anyone who reasonably suspects that abuse is taking place to inform the authorities. Some people, however, such as school staff, athletic coaches, and pediatric physicians, are duty-bound by law to report incidences or reasonable suspicion of child abuse.